Helping whānau to build a better tomorrow today

Te Ira is a new joint venture located in South Auckland. Turuki Health Care is one of two founding partners – the other being PARS Inc. (People At Risk Solutions) Inc., an incorporated society with 116 years’ experience in delivering supports and services to mauhere (prisoners/ex-offenders) and their whānau members (whānau mauhere).

In 2014, recognising the need to develop new solutions for children 0-5, rangatahi (and more specifically Y-NEET) and their whānau, Turuki Health Care came together with PARS Inc. to form Te Ira, a charitable company with a clear call to action: “not one more generation of disadvantaged rangatahi”.

Te Ira’s purposes are to ‘umbrella’, lead and manage the delivery of new services, systemic change and social enterprise initiatives, drawing on the combined expertise of both Turuki Health Care and PARS – but doing things in new ways that address the root causes of systemic disadvantage as well as meeting immediate needs.

Te Ira’s philosophy has been built around the concept of ‘ira’ literally meaning ‘life principle’. In our case, Te Ira refers to the essence of whakapapa (genealogy) and human development. This means Te Ira will support whānau/families to create solid foundations that recognise and respect the mana (power) and rangatiratanga (authority) of their whakapapa. These foundations will support whānau to realise their positive contribution, unlimited potential and break cycles of disadvantage.

The aim of initiatives that come under Te Ira’s umbrella is to improve the intergenerational wellbeing of three priority client groups.

  • Children (0-5 years) – this includes children with multiple unmet needs and in particular those associated with whānau mauhere (i.e. they may have a parent, caregiver or whānau member who is in prison or is an ex-prisoner).
  • Y-NEET (12-24 years) – this includes rangatahi who are not in education, employment or training and rangatahi who are a mauhere (prisoner/ex-prisoner).
  • Vulnerable whānau connected to these children and rangatahi. In particular, whānau members who are a mauhere (either in prison or an ex-prisoner).